Will Romney’s Veep Choice Be the Safe Choice?

DAN SCHNUR, director, USC’s Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics.

This op-ed originally appeared at CNN.

If you agree that a presidential nominee comes to the selection of his running mate the same way a football coach develops strategy for the last few minutes of an important game, then Rob Portman and Tim Pawlenty are the political equivalents of running your fullback off-tackle.

There’s little risk associated with either choice: Both keep you moving slowly but surely in the right direction. So it’s no accident that as the polls stay close, speculation surrounding Mitt Romney’s vice presidential nominee has focused on these two eminently qualified but exceedingly cautious alternatives.

Earlier this year, when Romney trailed in the polls by wide margins, the strategic calculus was entirely different. When your team is behind by a couple of touchdowns, you put the ball in the

How to Save the Euro: A Little More Inflation in Germany, Please

ARIS PROTOPAPADAKIS, professor of business and finance, USC Marshall School of Business.

This op-ed originally appeared at the Huffington Post.

Euro zone leaders’ latest plan to rescue the euro, agreed to late last month, focuses on two crises: the continent’s ailing banks and the sovereign-debt woes of Europe’s southern peripheral economies. Unfortunately, their blueprint neglects a third crisis that continues to grow and could bring down the euro zone: Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain are becoming increasingly uncompetitive economically relative to Germany.

Most economists agree that renewed economic growth is essential for saving the euro. The problem is that the effects of measures such as creating a banking union, the centerpiece of the recent summit’s rescue plan, may save the banking system but will do nothing to reverse the loss of competitiveness among the region’s economies. The euro zone can’t wait much longer, as the steadily rising borrowing costs of Spain and Italy demonstrate. It needs to start growing now, and the fastest and surest way to stimulate growth without increasing deficits is for Germany to accept a much looser monetary policy and the consequent higher inflation to help restore the competitiveness of Europe’s peripheral economies.

Has Proposition 13 Lost Its Relevance?

DOWELL MYERS, demographer and professor of planning, USC’s Price School of Public Policy.

This op-ed originally appeared in the Sacramento Bee.

Proposition 13 is widely regarded as the third rail in state politics: Touch it and you’re politically dead. It has earned that sacrosanct status because it solved some urgent problems for California homeowners. But that was a generation ago, a different time with different problems. As we face the challenge of reviving the state’s housing market and finding a reliable revenue source for freeways, schools and other public services, we should consider how Proposition 13 should serve us in the future.

We’re Not Living in Mayberry

SHERRY BEBITCH JEFFE, senior fellow, USC’s Price School of Public Policy.

This op-ed originally appeared at Prop Zero.

On the same day that the passing of Andy Griffith, the beloved TV sheriff of fictional Mayberry — that perfect epitome of small-town values — made front page news, the above-the-fold, page A1 headline in the Los Angeles Times read: “Office Seekers Recall Cudahy Intimidation.”

As part of an ongoing probe of alleged civic corruption in Cudahy, Calif. –a small, working-class community — the FBI uncovered evidence of election fraud. Three local officials had already been arrested on bribery charges.

Clearly, we don’t live in Mayberry.

Cudahy is only one example of a pattern of civic dysfunction that includes fiscal mismanagement and just plain corruption, which has long bedeviled smaller California cities, particularly in eastern LA County.

Don’t Expect Fireworks With New Mexican President

PAMELA K. STARR, associate professor of international relations, USC Dornsife.

This op-ed originally appeared in the Los Angeles Times.

Enrique Peña Nieto, the fresh-faced politician Mexicans elected this week to be their president, represents the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which completely dominated Mexican politics for 71 years until 2000. Many Mexicans are concerned that the PRI’s return will lead to a restoration of autocratic rule, an officially sanctioned detente with organized crime or a marked deterioration in bilateral cooperation. But these things are unlikely.

Will Mexico’s New President Rethink Drug War Cooperation With U.S.?

PAMELA K. STARR, associate professor of international relations, USC Dornsife.

This op-ed originally appeared in Foreign Affairs.

U.S.-Mexico security cooperation has been strikingly close and effective during the tenure of Mexican President Felipe Calderón. A country that had traditionally seen the United States as the principal threat to its national security has come to accept its northern neighbor as a partner in the battle against organized crime. Mexican intelligence agencies and naval units now collaborate closely with U.S. security personnel despite the historic reluctance of Mexico’s highly nationalistic military establishment to do so. At the same time, the United States, a country that had traditionally seen Mexico as a weak and unreliable counterpart, has learned to see its southern neighbor as an increasingly trusted associate. The United States now willingly shares sensitive intelligence with Mexican officials, playing a critical role in improving the effectiveness of Mexican counternarcotics operations. Just a generation ago, this would have been unthinkable.