Posts Tagged ‘ new york times ’

The 21st Century Silver Spoon

November 13, 2013
The 21st Century Silver Spoon

ELIZABETH CURRID-HALKETT, associate professor of urban planning, USC's Price School.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on Nov. 10.

In 1899, the sociologist Thorstein Veblen scathingly critiqued what he called the “conspicuous consumption” of America’s upper class. The rich were so obsessed with their social status, he wrote, that they would go to gratuitous lengths to signal it. His famous example was silver flatware: handcrafted silver spoons, though no more “serviceable” than and hardly distinguishable from aluminum...

Read more »

The Outrageous Cost of the Angelina Jolie Test

May 21, 2013
The Outrageous Cost of the Angelina Jolie Test

DAVID AGUS, professor of medicine and engineering, Keck School of Medicine of USC.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on May 21.

Angelina Jolie's revelation that she had had a preventive double mastectomy was eloquent and brave. She had learned that she inherited a faulty copy of a gene, BRCA1, that put her at high risk for invasive breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer. Now women everywhere are asking: Should I get the same test?...

Read more »

Our Internal Food-Traffic Regulator

April 29, 2013
Our Internal Food-Traffic Regulator

KATHLEEN A. PAGE, assistant professor, Keck School of Medicine of USC, and ROBERT S. SHERWIN, professor of medicine, Yale University.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on April 28.

Imagine that, instead of this article, you were staring at a plate of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies. The mere sight and smell of them would likely make your mouth water. The first bite would be enough to wake up brain areas that control reward, pleasure and emotion...

Read more »

Successful and Schizophrenic

January 28, 2013
Successful and Schizophrenic

ELYN SAKS, professor of law, USC Gould School of Law.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on Jan. 25

Thirty years ago, I was given a diagnosis of schizophrenia. My prognosis was “grave”: I would never live independently, hold a job, find a loving partner, get married. My home would be a board-and-care facility, my days spent watching TV in a day room with other...

Read more »

How to Escape the Debt Ceiling Limit

January 11, 2013
How to Escape the Debt Ceiling Limit

EDWARD KLEINBARD, professor of law, USC's Gould School of Law.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on Jan. 10.

The fiscal cliff may have been avoided, but an even higher-stakes political standoff — this time, over the federal debt ceiling — is just around the bend. Congressional Republicans have said they will demand immense cuts to popular government programs in exchange for agreeing to raise the nation’s authorized borrowing limit...

Read more »

The 2,000-Year-Old Prescription to Control Health Costs

December 13, 2012
The 2,000-Year-Old Prescription to Control Health Costs

DAVID AGUS, professor of medicine and engineering, Keck School of USC.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on Dec. 11.

The inexorable rise in health care spending, as all of us know, is a problem. But what’s truly infuriating, as we watch America’s medical bill soar, is that our conversation has focused almost exclusively on how to pay for that care, not on reducing our need for it. In the endless debate about “health care reform,” few...

Read more »

Obamacare Exchanges May Be Too Small to Succeed

November 26, 2012
Obamacare Exchanges May Be Too Small to Succeed

DANA P. GOLDMAN, director of USC's Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, MICHAEL CHERNEW and ANUPAN JENA, professor of health policy at Harvard University.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times on Nov. 23.

With the re-election of President Obama, the Affordable Care Act is back on track for being carried out in 2014. Central to its success will be the creation of health-insurance exchanges in each state. Beneficiaries will be able to go...

Read more »

The Medicare Disadvantage

October 16, 2012
The Medicare Disadvantage

DANA GOLDMAN, director of USC's Schaeffer Center, ADAM LEIVE, graduate student at University of Pennsylvania and DANIEL MCFADDEN, senior fellow, Schaeffer Center.

This op-ed originally appeared at the New York Times.

One question at the center of the Medicare debate is whether private insurance companies have a future role to play in the huge federal program. Paul Ryan’s 2012 budget proposal gives private health plans a starring role in the form of a voucher program. But some economists...

Read more »

New China Syndrome: Richer, Unhappy

September 28, 2012
New China Syndrome: Richer, Unhappy

RICHARD A. EASTERLIN, professor of economics, USC Dornsife.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times.

China’s new leaders, who will be anointed next month at the Communist Party’s 18th National Congress in Beijing, might want to rethink the Faustian bargain their predecessors embraced some 20 years ago: namely, that social stability could be bought by rapid economic growth. As the recent riots at a Foxconn factory in northern China demonstrate, growth alone, even at sustained, spectacular rates,...

Read more »

The Shrinking World of Responsibility

July 29, 2012
The Shrinking World of Responsibility

JOHN MONTEROSSO, associate professor of psychology, USC Dornsife, and BARRY SCHWARTZ, professor of psychology, Swarthmore.

This op-ed originally appeared in the New York Times.

Are you responsible for your behavior if your brain “made you do it”? Often we think not. For example, research now suggests that the brain’s frontal lobes, which are crucial for self-control, are not yet mature in adolescents. This finding has helped shape attitudes about whether young people are fully responsible for their actions. In 2005, when...

Read more »

For daily ThinkUSC updates, enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

USC News Releases

FeedWind